ID the Future Podcasting on Intelligent Design and Evolution

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Ann Gauger: Intelligent Design in the Laboratory

On this episode of ID the Future, Sarah Chaffee interviews Ann Gauger about intelligent design laboratory research. Dr. Gauger explains several key projects, including Behe’s review of peer-reviewed work on bacteria and viruses, Biologic’s work with proteins and enzymes, and how these impact the evolution debate.

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A New Book Refuting Theistic Evolution Puts Ape-to-Man Under the Microscope: Pt. 1

On this episode of ID The Future, we begin a series on human origins with biologist Ann Gauger, CSC Director of Science Communications. Gauger centers her discussion around a big new anthology from Crossway Books that she contributed to and helped edit, Theistic Evolution: A Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Critique. Among the tenets of theistic evolution is the idea that humans evolved from a large population of ape-like creatures. But is that idea scientifically plausible? Today’s episode delves into the fossil evidence. Listen in as Gauger describes not a mere gap in the fossil record but a great gulf, between australopithecines (an ancient ape-like creature) and humans.

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An Overview of Theistic Evolution: A Scientific, Philosophical and Theological Critique

On this episode of ID The Future, biologist Ann Gauger, CSC Director of Science Communications, discusses a big new anthology she contributed to and helped edit, Theistic Evolution. Gauger discusses the reception that the new book recently received at the Evangelical Theological Society meeting, and gives an overview of the book. In her conversation with host Sarah Chaffee, the two home in on the anthology’s contribution from leading chemist James Tour and the problems that synthetic chemistry pose for modern evolutionary theory. Gauger also summarizes a nano-tech breakthrough Tour’s research team has made in cancer research.

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Gauger: Is It Easy to Get A New Protein?

On this episode of ID the Future, Ann Gauger discusses a central argument used by evolutionary biologists to say it’s simple to get new proteins. Listen in to learn more about nylonase, and whether it shows that purely natural processes can produce biological information.

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March and July Offer Two Great Chances to Learn More about Intelligent Design

On this episode of ID the Future, learn about educational opportunities coming up with Discovery Institute! Ann Gauger shares about the next ID Education Day and the Summer Seminars. Listen in to find out more.

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Inside the Cell: “Come Further Up, Come Further In!”

On this episode of ID the Future, CSC Senior Fellow Dr. Ann Gauger talks about a recent paper in the journal Cell, and how it seems that the more we look, the greater order we find. She discusses a critical transition in embryo development, a compound which aids this transition, and the origins of this compound. According to Gauger, this order may point beyond neo-Darwinian processes.

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Inside the Cell: Death and Self-Sacrifice

On this episode of ID the Future, Sarah Chaffee interviews CSC Senior Fellow Ann Gauger about apoptosis – or self-induced cell death – and how it plays into multicellular life. Listen in to learn more about the immune system, development, and how apoptosis demonstrates purpose.

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Inside the Cell: DNA as a Library

On this episode of ID the Future, CSC Senior Fellow Ann Gauger discusses the library of the cell. She delves into transcription and translation and the speed with which these processes take place. Listen in to learn more about the workings of the cell!

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How Chimps and Humans are Different, Pt. 4: Anatomy and Behavior

On this episode of ID the Future, Ann Gauger discusses physiological, anatomical, cultural and behavioral differences between humans and chimpanzees.How long would it take to acquire needed mutations by Darwinian mechanisms? Much, much longer than the available timeframe, says Dr. Gauger.

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