ID the Future Intelligent Design, Evolution, and Science Podcast

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Green blue abstract exoplanet outer space vibrant sea. Waves, splashes and drops of water paint. Mysterious esoteric depths of the galactic ocean

Guillermo Gonzalez and Jay Richards on Science Sensationalism

On this episode of ID the Future, philosopher Jay Richards and astrobiologist Guillermo Gonzalez, co-authors of The Privileged Planet: How Our Place in the Cosmos is Designed for Discovery, discuss reports on another extra-solar planet recently in the news. Read More ›
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Jay Richards Interviewing Gale Pooley at COSM 2019

Jay Richards at COSM Talks Kurzweil and Strong AI

On this episode of ID the Future, Andrew McDiarmid catches up with philosopher Jay Richards at the recent COSM conference in greater Seattle. The two discuss the history of George Gilder’s Telecosm conferences and how the first one gave birth to a book Richards edited and contributed to 18 years ago, Are We Spiritual Machines? Ray Kurzweil vs. the Critics of Strong A.I. Is the “singularity” coming, as Kurzweil argues there and elsewhere, when machines equal and then quickly surpass human intelligence? Does “machine learning” really mean learning? Will “Skynet” wake up? Jay describes Kurzweil’s sunny version of strong AI and the dystopian version. Then he argues the other side, namely that human beings possess something beyond the purely material, Read More ›

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Abstract planets and space background

The Circumstellar Habitable Zone Just Shrank

On this episode of ID the Future, Discovery Institute Senior Fellow Jay Richards speaks with astrobiologist Guillermo Gonzalez about new research just reported in the Astrophysical Journal. The research suggests that the circumstellar habitable zone for terrestrial planets around stars is narrower than previously thought. This zone around stars, often referred to as the “goldilocks zone,” is where planets are not too hot and not too cold to support liquid water on the surface and, with it, complex life. But there’s another factor, previously underappreciated, which greatly curtails how much further a planet can be situated from its host star without running into trouble. It makes earth’s position that much more fine-tuned for life and, as Richards and Gonzalez discuss, Read More ›

Jay Richards on How Materialism Dismantles Itself, and the Self

On this episode of ID the Future, philosopher and Discovery Institute senior fellow Jay Richards shows how materialism is an acid that eats itself along with the self. Richards argues that it also eats all the immaterial things that make science work — all while posing as objective science. The interview is taken from Discovery Institute’s new Science Uprising initiative, featuring high-concept short YouTube videos and single-expert interviews touch on a wide range of subjects related to intelligent design, philosophical materialism, theism, atheism and modern Darwinism. Richards and other familiar faces are among the experts, along with two or three distinguished scientists who may be new to followers of ID the Future. Check it out here.

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Guillermo Gonzalez and Jay Richards on Recent Discoveries Supporting The Privileged Planet

On this episode of ID the Future, Jay Richards and astrobiologist Guillermo Gonzalez discuss several discoveries made in the past 15 years supporting their conclusions in The Privileged Planet: How Our Place in the Cosmos Is Designed for Discovery.

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Guillermo Gonzalez on What’s Changed in the 15 Years Since The Privileged Planet

On this episode of ID the Future, host Jay Richards and astronomer Guillermo Gonzalez, authors of The Privileged Planet: How Our Place in the Cosmos Is Designed for Discovery, discuss what’s changed in the 15 years since the book first appeared. One big change, the number of exo-planets discovered has exploded from 200 or so to several thousand. Gonzalez walks through this and other exciting recent advances in astronomy, and the two discuss how these new discoveries bear on the predictions and arguments they advanced in their book. Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast.

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The first-ever image of a black hole was released Wednesday by a consortium of researchers, showing the

Guillermo Gonzalez on the First-Ever Imaging of a Black Hole

On this episode of ID the Future, Jay Richards interviews astronomer Guillermo Gonzalez on the first images ever taken of a black hole, released to the public early in April 2019. Not that it’s exactly an “image,” for as Gonzalez explains, no light can escape a black hole. But this massive object — equaling billions of suns in mass — in the M87 galaxy still provides important information, adding to the list of confirmations for Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity, which also provides further support for Big Bang cosmology. And that, in turn, tells us our universe isn’t infinitely old — so where did it come from, if not an intelligent designer?

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The Copernican Principle and The Privileged Planet with Jay Richards

On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, Jay Richards discusses the Copernican principle and pre-Copernican cosmology. We’ve just passed the 15th anniversary of The Privileged Planet, so it’s appropriate to revisit one of the questions Richards and Gonzalez set out to answer in their book: Is the earth really an insignificant speck in an impersonal universe? Do we really exist for no reason?

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Australian Zebra Finch flock of five, perched on a branch. Clean blue background

Michael Behe’s Darwin Devolves: Evolution Works, But Nothing Like What They Claim For It

On this episode of ID the Future, Jay Richards interviews biologist and Center for Science and Culture senior fellow Michael Behe on his forthcoming book Darwin Devolves: The New Science About DNA That Challenges Evolution, available now for pre-order. Very recent advances in gene sequencing show that genetic mutations and natural selection sometimes work to create niche advantages, but by breaking genes, not by building new ones. It’s like increasing fuel efficiency by jettisoning things from your car: great if fuel efficiency is a matter of life or death, not so great if you actually wanted that back seat in there. And in any case, it isn’t how a car gets built in the first place. In the same way, Darwinian evolution can Read More ›

Rob Crowther Debriefs Jay Richards on the Dallas Conference on Science & Faith

On this episode of ID the Future, host Robert Crowther speaks with Discovery Institute Senior Fellow Jay Richards, a speaker at last weekend’s Dallas Conference on Science & Faith. Coming available soon on video, this conference featured Richards, Eric Metaxas, Stephen Meyer, and world-renowned synthetic organic chemist James Tour — plus a surprise guest. For all the great presenters there, though, Richards’ favorite feature of the conference was the thousand attendees — some of them skeptics — who stayed straight through to the close and beyond, asking questions and learning that science, more than ever, supports faith in a designing intelligence.