ID the Future Podcasting on Intelligent Design and Evolution

Giordano Bruno: A Martyr, Yes, But Not for Science

On this episode of ID the Future, Andrew McDiarmid continues his conversation with historian of science Michael Keas about Keas’ new ISI book Unbelievable: 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion. In chapter 4 of the work Keas explodes the myth that Giordano Bruno was a martyr for science, as science popularizers such as Neil DeGrasse Tyson make him out to be. 

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Flat-Earth Faith in the “Dark Ages”: More Unbelievable Myths That Won’t Die

On this episode of ID the Future, Andrew McDiarmid continues his conversation with science historian Michael Keas on myths of science and religion, based on Keas’ new work from ISI Books, Unbelievable: 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion. This time they tackle two golden oldies and a kicker: (1) that the West suffered a thousand-year “Dark Ages” after the fall of the Roman Empire, (2) that the Europeans from this period believed in a flat earth, and — the kicker! — that Christianity was responsible for both errors. Keas asks, if people are trying to use myths like this to attack religion’s track record on knowledge and education, shouldn’t they know more about what’s really true?

New Book Unbelievable: No Bill Nye, a Big Cosmos Isn’t a Problem for Religion

On this episode of ID the Future host Andrew McDiarmid continues his series with science historian Michael Keas about Mike’s new work from ISI Books, Unbelievable: 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion. Here they focus on the myth that a vast cosmos renders humanity insignificant, and in the process, discredits the Judeo-Christian worldview. As Keas notes, science popularizer Bill Nye recently dusted off this old saw, but the Old Testament itself, in the Psalms, depicts man and the earth as tiny in compared to a vast universe. Keas also discusses C.S. Lewis’s take on the matter. Lewis pointed out that atheists have argued that a universe where earth is the lone habitable planet argues against God. Read More ›

New Book Debunks Atheist Myths about the History of Faith and Science

On this episode of ID the Future, Andrew McDiarmid talks with science historian Michael Keas about Keas’ revealing new work from ISI Books, Unbelievable: 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion. Read More ›

J. P. Moreland: This Moral Knowledge a Surer Bet than the Electron

On this episode of ID the Future, Biola philosopher J. P. Moreland concludes a four-part series with host Mike Keas on scientism (not to be confused with objective scientific investigation). Moreland calls scientism “the single most destructive idea on the stage of life today. … It’s evil and it’s everywhere.” Strong words! But he isn’t without hope. Moreland explains how moral knowledge can be stronger, more secure, than even much scientific knowledge, and far more secure than the self-defeating materialist ideology that is scientism. He’s distilling arguments from his new book Scientism and Secularism: Learning to Respond to a Dangerous Ideology.

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J.P. Moreland: Scientism Fuels Our Culture’s Turmoil

On this episode of ID the Future, host Mike Keas and philosopher J. P. Moreland continue their conversation on Moreland’s new book Scientism and Secularism: Learning to Respond to a Dangerous Ideology. Scientism is the view that science trumps all other knowledge, but Moreland and Keas reveal in this podcast just how much science depends on both philosophy and history. Scientism is, thus, self-defeating. Nevertheless, and as Moreland goes on to argue, it remains “at the bottom of the turmoil that is facing our culture,” and many young people are being sucked into its errors.

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J. P. Moreland on the Contradictions of Scientism

On this episode of ID the Future, host Mike Keas begins a conversation with philosopher J. P. Moreland about Moreland’s new book Scientism and Secularism: Learning to Respond to a Dangerous Ideology. Moreland explains scientism as the belief that only the hard sciences can provide any reliably true knowledge. “It’s in the drinking water,” he says, but it’s also self-refuting, and therefore irrational — and very damaging besides. Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast.

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Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace: Darwin’s Pattern for Scientific Dialogue that Darwinists Could Stand to Follow

On this episode of ID the Future host Mike Keas talks a third time with Michael Flannery about Flannery’s new book Nature’s Prophet: Alfred Russel Wallace and His Evolution from Natural Selection to Natural Theology. The surprising word come out of this conversation is how open Darwin was to Wallace’s opposing viewpoint — unlike many Darwinists today. Some of Flannery’s recent experience with historians of science, though, shows there is at least hope in some quarters for increasing academic openness today.

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Kenneth Miller’s Darwinian Theism: Trying, and Failing, to Square a Circle

On this episode of ID the Future, Pr. Emeritus Michael Flannery (U of Alabama-Birmingham) continues his discussion of evolutionist Kenneth Miller’s recent book The Human Instinct: How We Evolved to Have Reason, Consciousness, and Free Will. Flannery suggests that Miller’s “theistic evolution” is more precisely Darwinian theism — and that such a marriage is as ultimately hopeless as squaring the proverbial circle.

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A Critique of Evolutionist Kenneth Miller’s New Book The Human Instinct

On this episode of ID the Future, host Mike Keas interviews Professor Emeritus Michael Flannery (U of Alabama-Birmingham) on evolutionist Kenneth Miller’s new book The Human Instinct: How We Evolved to Have Reason, Consciousness, and Free Will. Miller is prominent as a science educator and supporter of Neo-Darwinian theistic evolution. Flannery, a historian of science, argues that Miller’s attempt to defend human exceptionalism on Neo-Darwinian grounds runs into fatal difficulties, as have similar attempts before.

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