ID the Future Podcasting on Intelligent Design and Evolution

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Intelligent Design in South Africa: Brian Miller and Ray Bohlin Report

This episode of ID the Future features a conversation between physicist Brian Miller and biologist Ray Bohlin and about their recent speaking tour in South Africa, where they made a case for intelligent design. The pair talk about the open reception they received from sympathizers and skeptics alike. South Africa, they say, is less infused with materialistic philosophy than is Europe or America’s research universities. This means an open door for ID. However, it’s a door that threatens to close, they warn. Listen in to learn more.

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Jonathan Wells on the Eye Evolution Simulation That Failed

On this episode of ID the Future, biologist Jonathan Wells talks with Ray Bohlin about a conversation he imagined between evolutionists Richard Dawkins and Dan-Eric Nilsson, and published recently at Evolution News. Dawkins had lectured (in real life) on Nilsson’s computer simulation work, showing the human eye could have evolved easily and quickly. What would the two of them have said when Nilsson contacted Dawkins and told him, “I’m sorry, Richard, but I didn’t do that simulation?” Wells imagines them talking about rushing the work on that simulation. But then, what about the next conversation when the simulation failed?

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The Designed Body: Our Irreducibly Complex Blood Pressure Control System

Physician Howard Glicksman talks with host Ray Bohlin about the amazing control systems involved in something we’re all familiar with: blood pressure. It’s a system requiring adjustment at every point along the way, from blood volume to blood pumping velocity to pressure out in the blood vessels. And it has to be able to act fast in order to keep us alive — which leads to some hard questions for Mr. Darwin.

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Glucose Systems in the Body — Another Instance of Irreducible Complexity

Dr. Howard Glicksman, author of an extended series at Evolution News on “The Designed Body,” is interviewed today by Ray Bohlin on glucose, glycogen, glucogon, insulin — all part of an extended multi-step series essential for life — an irreducibly complex series.   “If students only knew how life worked,” says Dr. Glicksman,” … they’d quickly come to realize that when it comes to figuring out where it all came from, common sense tells us it was intelligent design, and it’s the Darwinists who are suffering from an illusion.”

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Intelligent Design in Brazil: A Jonathan Wells Field Report

“It’s been a long time since I’ve had such respectful give-and-take, from both professors and students.” Jonathan Wells gives that encouraging word and more when he speaks with Ray Bohlin about his recent visit to Brazil. Interest in intelligent design is strong there, audiences were large, and the Q&A lively. Among other things, Wells reports on Discovery Institute-Mackenzie at Mackenzie Presbyterian University in São Paulo.

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Darwin’s Finches: Meet the New Hype, Same as the Old Hype

On this episode of ID The Future, Ray Bohlin talks with CSC Senior Fellow Jonathan Wells, author of the Zombie Science, about some new hype over Darwin’s finches, an icon of evolution that just won’t die. Seventeen years after Icons of Evolution, Darwin’s finches are back in the news and can still be found in biology textbooks despite the fact that they illustrate no net evolutionary change nor did they play a role in helping Darwin formulate his theory.

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Michael Egnor on What the Craniopagus Twins Tells Us about Mind and Brain

On this episode of ID The Future, neurosurgery professor Michael Egnor explores the case of Tatiana and Krista, the “Craniopagus Twins.” Their condition, he says, provides evidence against strict materialism.  Tatiana and Krista are connected at the thalamus (which controls such things as wakefulness, motor function and vision) through a structure called a thalamic bridge. This bridge enables them to see through each other’s eyes to and control each other’s limbs. Egnor explains how their separate personalities and thoughts nevertheless show that there is something about the mind not reducible to the brain. Egnor also goes through the mind-brain research of Roger Sperry, Benjamin Libet and Wilder Penfield.

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Michael Egnor: Experiments Show that Mind is More Than Brain

On this episode of ID The Future, host Ray Bohlin talks with Michael Egnor, a pediatric neurosurgeon and professor of neurosurgery at State University of New York Stony Brook about ways modern science validates the idea that the mind is not reducible to the brain. They delve into oddities of neuroscience that indicate that there is more going on in the brain than mere chemistry, and, in particular, walk through the seminal work of Adrian Owen on MRIs and what it reveals.

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A Doc Looks at Why Water is Important for Human Life

On this episode of ID the Future, to celebrate Michael Denton’s newest book, The Wonder of Water, we bring you a conversation between Ray Bohlin and Howard Glicksman on the body’s wondrous control systems for using water. Dr. Glicksman is a medical doctor and author of an extended series of posts at Evolution News & Science Today, “The Designed Body.”

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Günter Bechly on Discovering Design at a Darwin Day Exhibition

On this episode of ID the Future, hear a clip from the ID film Revolutionary, and join Ray Bohlin and Michael Behe as they discuss how German paleo-entomologist Günter Bechly became convinced of intelligent design, and the lessons to glean from Bechly’s dramatic story. In the time since this documentary was filmed and this podcast recorded, Bechly was forced to resign from his position as curator at the prestigious State Museum of Natural History in Stuttgart, Germany. And now this month, his English language Wikipedia page has disappeared. Bechly, meanwhile, is standing by his convictions. Revolutionary the film is now available online here.