ID the Future Podcasting on Intelligent Design and Evolution

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Children of Light Author Michael Denton on the Dazzling Evidence of Fine-Tuning

On this episode of ID the Future, Michael Denton explores a “miraculous convergence of properties” for life. Denton is both a medical doctor and a PhD biochemist, and now the author of the new book Children of Light: The Astonishing Properties of Sunlight That Make Us Possible (ebook available here). He lets his astonishment flow freely in this interview with host Sarah Chaffee, with topics ranging from the light of the sun to key chemicals here on earth. Taken together, it’s “an astonishing coincidence. … Science has discovered the fine-tuning… it’s not in doubt.… I’m blown away by this evidence.” And the common-sense conclusion, he says, is that a designing intelligence has fiddled with things to make life like us possible.

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Foresight in Nature: A Hallmark of Design

On this episode of ID the Future, host Sarah Chaffee speaks with physician and author Dr. Geoffrey Simmons about nature’s foresight. Engineers designing a car have to plan for all kinds of conditions the car might encounter for the car to be successful. Something like this also appears to be necessary for organisms — including the human organism, as Dr. Simmons argues in a recent Evolution News article. Blind natural forces, he argues, don’t have what it takes. Instead it requires real foresight, a hallmark of intelligent design.

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Billions of Missing Links: Electricity and Bioluminescence

In this episode of ID the Future from the vault, hear about electricity and bioluminescence, as highlighted in Dr. Geoffrey Simmons’ book, Billions of Missing Links. Listen in to learn about how a knee jerk reaction, eels, and the knife fish all use electrical impulses.

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Octopuses from the Sky: Scientists Propose “Aliens Seeded Life on Earth”

On this episode of ID the Future, host Sarah Chaffee and biologist Ann Gauger discuss panspermia, the topic of a peer-reviewed paper published recently by several very serious scientists. Panspermia tries to sidestep problems in origins biology by suggesting that, to quote the title of an old science fiction movie, “it came from outer space.” And yes, maybe even aliens sent it our way. Maybe (honest — this is a real theory) the first octopuses came here special delivery, as encapsulated embryos falling from the sky. Anything but intelligent design, for these very serious scientists.

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The Tenth Anniversary of the Louisiana Science Education Act — and Why It Matters

On this episode of ID the Future, host Sarah Chaffee talks with Center for Science and Culture co-founder Dr. John West about the Louisiana Science Education Act, passed ten years ago this week. Dr. West explains why it mattered then for academic freedom, how it’s stood up to criticism in the ten years since then, and why it matters today — including the example it sets for other states as well-crafted, resilient, and science-friendly legislation, that even the ACLU has recognized it needs to support!

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Celebrating the Tenth Anniversary of Academic Freedom in Louisiana Public Schools

On this episode of ID the Future, Sarah Chaffee interviews Dr. Wade Warren, zoologist and holder of the C.J. Cavanaugh Endowed Chair in Biology at Louisiana College, on the ten year anniversary of the passage of the Louisiana Science Education Act. This act gave teachers freedom to teach both the scientific strengths and weaknesses of evolution — not including intelligent design or religion — without fear of reprisal. Dr. Warren recalls the reasons he advocated for its passage, and discusses pluses and minuses with the more recent Louisiana state science standards — including some scientists’ strange “discomfort” with some facts, even though they don’t disagree with them.

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New Michael Chaberek Book Is a Debate-Changer on Thomistic Evolution

On this episode of ID the Future, philosopher Logan Gage speaks with Sarah Chaffee about the new book Aquinas and Evolution by Fr. Michael Chaberek. Philosophers in the tradition of Thomas Aquinas — Thomistic evolutionists — have pressured Intelligent Design theorists, saying that it gets Aquinas wrong, in fact it even gets God wrong. Dr. Gage says Fr. Chaberek’s book counters that pressure and shows how “Thomistic” evolution contradicts Aquinas.

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Living Fossils Really Do Live — and Pose Problems for Evolution

On this episode of ID the Future, German paleo-entomologist Dr. Günter Bechly explains the real, living problem of living fossils — a term resisted by evolutionists though coined by Darwin himself and undeniably a living reality. These plants and animals have remained unchanged over eons: in the case of the horseshoe crab, nearly half a billion years through enormous upheaval.

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Scientist Names Dragonfly Species after Michael Behe. Gets Roasted. Shrugs.

On this episode of ID the Future, paleoentomologist Günter Bechly discusses the new dragonfly fossil that he discovered, described, and named after intelligent design theorist Michael Behe — Chrismooreia michaelbehei. Bechly describes what’s remarkable about this stunning fossil, explains some problems dragonflies poses for Darwinism, and shares some of the strangely uninformed criticisms he’s received for naming the species after Behe.

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Dr. Andrew Jones on “Actually Measuring Things Rather Than Telling Stories” in Population Genetics

On this episode of ID the Future, Dr. Andrew Jones tells about his work on population genetics, with host Sarah Chaffee. Using statistical physics methods, by which, as he puts it, “we’re actually measuring things rather than telling stories,” scientists are refuting theories claiming that there could be no original human pair. These methods can show as well that even if evolution were otherwise possible, it would take much longer than the available time could allow.