ID the Future Podcasting on Intelligent Design and Evolution

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A Paleontologist on Why the “Cambrian Explosion” Label Persists

On this episode of ID the Future, Sarah Chaffee interviews German paleo-entomologist Günter Bechly on the Cambrian explosion, the relatively sudden appearance of new body plans in the fossil record an estimated 550 million years ago. Dr. Bechly explains how the Cambrian explosion has been challenged by non-experts with an anti-ID bias, yet remains very much a real event in the opinion of specialists in the field — and with the continuing failure of Darwinian explanations, a strong source of evidential support for intelligent design.

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Hungarian Philosopher Philip Goff Partly Right: The Universe Reflects a Mind

On this episode of ID the Future, neurosurgeon Michael Egnor talks with host Sarah Chaffee about a theory that Hungarian philosopher Philip Goff calls “cosmopsychism.” According to cosmopsychism, the basic reality of the universe is mind, one wholly contained within the universe. Egnor says Goff gets it partly right but only partly. There are at least three very good reasons to believe there is Mind at the basis of everything, Egnor says, but as he goes on to argue, the classic view of this Mind transcending the universe remains more rational.

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Academic Freedom Update and Freescience.today

Robert Crowther speaks with Sarah Chaffee, the CSC’s Program Officer in Education and Public Policy, about some recent threats to academic freedom in America, particularly in the area of evolution and intelligent design. The two also discuss a new website, Freescience.today, supporting academic freedom through resources for school board members, teachers and students; stories of academic discrimination; and strategic advice on getting involved to defend the academic freedom of students and educators.

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Censorship Double Feature—A Double Standard, and the Dangers of the Anti-Science Label

On this episode of ID the Future, we explore two topics. Sarah Chaffee analyzes New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof’s viewpoints on intellectual diversity. Kristof makes a compelling case for hiring faculty with varying political and religious viewpoints, but stops short when it comes to those skeptical of evolution. Then, David Klinghoffer discusses the “anti-science” label – and how it’s now used by those on both sides of disagreements on scientific issues.

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Günter Bechly on Fossils and Common Descent, Pt 2

German paleontologist Günter Bechly was co-author (with Stephen C. Meyer) of the chapter titled The Fossil Record and Universal Common Ancestry, in the major new book Theistic Evolution: A Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Critique.  In this second conversation with Sarah Chaffee on this topic, Bechly speaks of “life’s second ‘big bang,'” one of many discontinuities in the fossil record. “There’s no reasonable way,” he concludes, “to get from bacteria to mammals via evolutionary processes.”

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University of Chicago President Decries “Efforts to Suppress Discussion of Charles Darwin’s Work”

On this episode of ID the Future, Sarah Chaffee discusses the University of Chicago’s action to uphold academic freedom, including a letter to incoming freshman and a piece by Pres. Robert Zimmer in the Wall Street Journal. As Zimmer notes, “Every attempt to legitimize silencing creates justification for others to restrain speech that they do not like in the future.”

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Günter Bechly on Fossils and Common Descent, Pt 1

Sarah Chaffee interviews German paleontologist Günter Bechly on the book Theistic Evolution: A Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Critique, specifically his chapter with Stephen Meyer on The Fossil Record and Universal Common Ancestry. Bechly, who had been a prominent proponent of Darwinism, discovered late in his career that there are significant scientific reasons to doubt the evolutionary story. His chapter in the book describes some of these reasons.

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Zoo visitor at the gorilla enclosure

New Book Refuting Theistic Evolution Puts Ape-to-Man Under the Microscope: Pt. 2

On this episode of ID The Future, we continue a series on human origins with biologist Ann Gauger, CSC Director of Science Communications. Gauger centers her discussion around a big new anthology from Crossway Books that she contributed to and helped edit, Theistic Evolution: A Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Critique. Today’s episode delves into chimp and human DNA. Really, how similar are our genomes? Do protein-coding stretches of DNA tell the whole story? And is there enough time for genetic mutations to build the novelties that separate humans all other primates?

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Ann Gauger: Intelligent Design in the Laboratory

On this episode of ID the Future, Sarah Chaffee interviews Ann Gauger about intelligent design laboratory research. Dr. Gauger explains several key projects, including Behe’s review of peer-reviewed work on bacteria and viruses, Biologic’s work with proteins and enzymes, and how these impact the evolution debate.

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A New Book Refuting Theistic Evolution Puts Ape-to-Man Under the Microscope: Pt. 1

On this episode of ID The Future, we begin a series on human origins with biologist Ann Gauger, CSC Director of Science Communications. Gauger centers her discussion around a big new anthology from Crossway Books that she contributed to and helped edit, Theistic Evolution: A Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Critique. Among the tenets of theistic evolution is the idea that humans evolved from a large population of ape-like creatures. But is that idea scientifically plausible? Today’s episode delves into the fossil evidence. Listen in as Gauger describes not a mere gap in the fossil record but a great gulf, between australopithecines (an ancient ape-like creature) and humans.

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