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ID the Future Intelligent Design, Evolution, and Science Podcast
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Emily Reeves on Intersection of Biology and Engineering

Episode
1925
Guest
Emily Reeves
Duration
00:42:58
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Audio File (59 mb)
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The biochemical revolution of the last century has revealed powerful evidence of design in living things. Now, scientists are beginning to realize the benefits of studying designed systems through an engineering lens. On today’s episode, Dr. Emily Reeves discusses the intersection of biology and engineering with Fred Williams and Doug McBurney, hosts of the Real Science Radio podcast.

In this 45-minute chat, Dr. Reeves explains the importance of using engineering principles to understand biological systems. She shares her journey from being an intern at MIT to studying bacteria in graduate school at Texas A&M, and how her faith in God was strengthened through her studies. During the conversation, Dr. Reeves shares her experiences and reactions to promoting the design perspective in biology, and emphasizes the predictive and creative potential of a top-down design framework in biology. Along the way, she also recommends books and papers that explore the connection between engineering and biology.

We’re grateful to hosts Fred Williams and Doug McBurney for permission to share this conversation on ID The Future. You can find Real Science Radio on YouTube and elsewhere in audio format.

Dig Deeper

We report regularly on the importance of an engineering perspective in biology. Here are some recent episodes:

The Engineered Adaptability of the Humble Guppy

The High Tech Animal Navigation That Defies Darwinian Explanations

The Role of Engineers in the Systems Biology Revolution

The Innovative Cellular Engineering That Keeps Us Alive

Engineering, Not Evolution, Explains the Body

The Human Body is a Marvel of Engineering

Is Adaptation Actually a Fight to Stay the Same?