ID the Future Podcasting on Intelligent Design and Evolution
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devolution

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Colony Characteristics of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped, coliform bacterium of the genus Escherichia that is commonly found in the lower intestine.

Michael Behe on E. Coli and a Citrate Death Spiral

On this episode of ID the Future, biochemist Michael Behe reviews the Long Term Evolution Experiment at Michigan State, where Richard Lenski’s team was initially excited to see what they thought was a new species forming in their flasks of E. coli. As Behe has written at Evolution News, one flask of E. coli in Lenski’s experiment evolved the ability to metabolize (“eat”) citrate in the presence of oxygen. But along with it came multiple mutations breaking genes, degrading genetic information, and ultimately increasing the bacteria’s death rates. It all goes to support Behe’s thesis in Darwin Devolves: evolution is good at creating niche advantages by breaking things; it isn’t good at building fundamentally novel form, the very thing the Read More ›

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Black gift box on a dark contrasted background, decorated with a textured bow and feathers, creating a romantic atmosphere. Typically used for birthday, anniversary presents, gift cards, post cards, l

Michael Behe Opens a Black Box for Christmas

On this episode of ID the Future, Lehigh University biochemist Michael Behe discusses the closing sections of his new book Darwin Devolves: The New Science about DNA That Challenges Evolution. He compares evolutionary biology in Darwin’s time and today to the world of astronomy before and after the telescope was invented. The cell was a black box to Darwin and his contemporaries. Today we can explore that black box like never before, much better even than even two decades ago, allowing us to observe what evolution can actually do at the molecular level. According to Behe, the answer is, not much. Evolution can create niche advantages by breaking certain things, but it doesn’t build fundamentally new structures or new machines. Read More ›

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Meyer, Berlinski and Yale’s David Gelernter Challenge Darwinism, Pt. 2

This episode of ID the Future features Part 2 of Peter Robinson’s conversation with Yale computer scientist David Gelernter and Discovery Institute senior fellows Stephen Meyer and David Berlinski.

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Photo by Jeffery Wong

The Venus Flytrap Takes a Bite Out of Darwinism

On this episode of ID the Future, Scotsman Andrew McDiarmid reads from Marcos Eberlin’s recent book Foresight: How the Chemistry of Life Reveals Planning and Purpose. In this excerpt, the distinguished Brazilian scientist highlights the challenge the Venus flytrap poses for evolutionary theory. Dr. Eberlin, the former president of the International Mass Spectrometry Association, describes the problem: The Venus flytrap, like all carnivorous plants, had no use for its insect-trapping function unless it also had an insect-digesting function. And vice versa. Did they really both evolve together? And how when there would be no functional advantage along much of the evolutionary pathway to the sophisticated finished system? Finally, how did this “evolutionary miracle” also happen in four other carnivorous plant Read More ›

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Man holding against white background one sport footwear sneaker with broken sole - quality manufacturing problems

Michael Behe on Natural Selection’s Inability to Build New Systems

On this episode of ID the Future, biochemist Michael Behe speaks further about his new book Darwin Devolves: The New Science about DNA That Challenges Evolution. Behe explains how evolutionists in the past had freedom to use their imaginations to suppose ways evolution could achieve major innovations, but new research at the molecular level now reveals obstacles previously unimagined. The most productive adaptations in nature tend overwhelmingly to be in one direction, Behe says, degrading or destroying genes, and no series of mutations have ever demonstrated the kind of coordinated effects needed to produce new systems.

Behe Responds to the Journal Science, Pt. 2: Darwin Devolves on Trial

On this episode of ID the Future, Andrew McDiarmid continues his conversation with biochemist Michael Behe, author of the newly released Darwin Devolves: The New Science About DNA That Challenges Evolution. Here Behe further presses the case that the review bypasses his book’s main point and that the reviewers appear to have misunderstood the plain language of one of his arguments in a previous book. Also, the reviewers claim that Behe hasn’t answered his critics’ objections on key points, a charge Behe shows is demonstrably false. Despite the negative review, Behe says he remains optimistic. Listen in to learn why. Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast.

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Australian Zebra Finch flock of five, perched on a branch. Clean blue background

Michael Behe’s Darwin Devolves: Evolution Works, But Nothing Like What They Claim For It

On this episode of ID the Future, Jay Richards interviews biologist and Center for Science and Culture senior fellow Michael Behe on his forthcoming book Darwin Devolves: The New Science About DNA That Challenges Evolution, available now for pre-order. Very recent advances in gene sequencing show that genetic mutations and natural selection sometimes work to create niche advantages, but by breaking genes, not by building new ones. It’s like increasing fuel efficiency by jettisoning things from your car: great if fuel efficiency is a matter of life or death, not so great if you actually wanted that back seat in there. And in any case, it isn’t how a car gets built in the first place. In the same way, Darwinian evolution can Read More ›