ID the Future Podcasting on Intelligent Design and Evolution
Topic

Thermodynamics

microscope with lab glassware, science laboratory research and development concept

Roger Olsen on the Mystery of Life’s Origin on the Early Earth

On this episode of ID the Future, Robert Marks interviews Roger Olsen, co-author of the groundbreaking 1984 book The Mystery of Life’s Origin. In the book’s epilogue they suggested that a designing intelligence stands as the best explanation for the origin of life. And with a revised and greatly expanded new edition of the book now available, he says that 36 years of additional research from the origin-of-life community has left their conclusions stronger than ever. Now an environmental scientist, Olsen has spent his career since then helping homes and families abroad protect children from the ravages of environmental pollution.

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Jeremy England’s Physics-Based OOL Theory Under the Microscope

On this episode of ID the Future, Brian Miller, who holds a Ph.D. in physics from Duke University, examines Dr. Jeremy England’s physics-based theory of the origin of life. England’s theory, based on his studies of “non-equilibrium systems,” suggests that a system driven strongly enough could create order and therefore be a potential explanation for the origin of life. Miller summarizes the theory and discusses what he sees as its fatal weaknesses.

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Abstract design of white powder snow cloud

Tornadoes, Ice and Cells: How Does Thermodynamics Inform Origin-of-Life Scenarios?

On this episode of ID the Future, Brian Miller discusses the thermodynamics of the origin of life. Listen in to learn more about equilibrium, self-organization, and how the cell defies natural tendencies towards high entropy and low energy. Materialistic explanations seem to hit a wall when examining the physics of abiogenesis.

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Dr. David Snoke: The “Maxwell’s Demon” Thought Experiment

On this episode of ID the Future, hear part 3 of a lecture given by David Snoke at a conference sponsored by the Christian Scientific Society. In this segment, Dr. Snoke, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Pittsburg, discusses the “Maxwell’s demon” thought experiment and evaluations the odds of an information processing system occurring spontaneously.

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