ID the Future Podcasting on Intelligent Design and Evolution
Topic

Biological Information

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Information, Specified Complexity and the Explanatory Filter

On this episode of ID the Future, we hear the third and final portion of a talk given at the 2020 Dallas Science and Faith conference. Daniel Reeves, education outreach coordinator at Discovery Institute, rounds out his extended explanation of intelligent design theory. Far from being “Gee whiz that’s complicated; it must be designed!,” the theory relies on well-defined concepts such as specified complexity and an explanatory filter that allows one to distinguish designed events from either chance, necessity, or a combination of the two. The key in the molecular biological realm: detecting functional information.

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Cosmos: Possible Worlds’ ‘Most Plausible’ Creation Myths

On this episode of ID the Future, philosopher Jay Richards hosts science historian Michael Keas in another conversation about Neil deGrasse Tyson’s series Cosmos: Possible Worlds. They talk this time about what the show itself calls its “most plausible creation myth… for the origin of life,” involving hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean floor — with no mention at all of the equally deep scientific problems with the idea. Tyson’s imagination wanders from there to a moon of Saturn to the Cambrian explosion, everywhere supposing that just because one or two necessary conditions exist for life, that’s all the explanation that’s needed. Richards and Keas ably explore why this is untrue. 

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Durston on Experimental, Inferential, and Fantasy Science — Pt. 2

On this episode of ID the Future, biophysicist and philosopher Kirk Durston continue his discussion of three types of science: (1) experimental science, (2) inferential science, and (3) fantasy science. In this second of three episodes, Durston recaps the three types but focuses on inferential science. He explains how it involves, in the historical sciences, abductive reasoning (inference to the best explanation), and he explains how such reasoning can be used as we consider the best explanation for the origin of biological information, and in such a way that it is rooted in observation.

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Durston on Experimental, Inferential, and Fantasy Science — Pt. 1

On this episode of ID the Future, biophysicist and philosopher Kirk Durston discusses his recent article series about three types of science — (1) experimental science, which is generally very trustworthy, with some exceptions; (2) inferential science, which can be trustworthy but often takes huge leaps into the doubtable and dodgy; and (3) fantasy science, which is essentially science fiction masquerading as actual science. In this first of three episodes, Durston focuses on experimental science. Such science is, at its best, reproducible and verifiable. Durston says he has yet to find a true conflict between experimental, reproducible scientific observations and his religious faith. The contradictions he encountered were all between his faith and the inferences that some scientists were drawing Read More ›

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Answering Our ID Critics: Distinguish Information In from Information About

In this episode of ID the Future, Mike Keas interviews attorney and engineer Eric Anderson about the first of two mistakes ID antagonists often make regarding information in nature. There is information to be gained about natural phenomena, like Saturn’s rings for example, but is there information actually in Saturn’s rings, or is that information produced by intelligent agents studying Saturn’s rings? The answer to that question should be clear — and it makes a huge difference in how we understand information and intelligence.

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Dr. David Snoke: The Physicality of Information

On this episode of ID the Future, listen to a lecture given by David Snoke at a conference sponsored by the Christian Scientific Society. Dr. Snoke, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Pittsburg, answers the question is information a physical entity?, and discusses the nature of information processing systems.

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William Dembski on the Gilmore & Glahn Show, pt. 1

On this episode of ID the Future, William Dembski is on the Gilmore & Glahn show, where he talks with John Gilmore about the theory of, and science behind, his latest book, Being as Communion. Dembski also discusses what he views as the greatest weakness of Darwinian evolution: the information problem.

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Censorship Loses: New Scientific Volume Challenges Neo-Darwinism

On this episode of ID the Future, Casey Luskin and Joshua Youngkin discuss the release of the new scientific volume Biological Information: New Perspectives, a multi-disciplinary analysis of standard evolutionary theory that challenges its ability to explain the origin of biological information. Luskin and Youngkin tell the story of how this volume was initially barred from publication under pressure from Darwin lobbyists, but has now been published. Listen in!