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Under the microscope- background macro for scientific medical concept - immune system attack a bacterial at a infection
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ID the Future Intelligent Design, Evolution, and Science Podcast
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Why This Virus is No Threat to Intelligent Design

Episode
1795
With
Raymond Bohlin
Guest
Cornelius Hunter
Duration
00:15:01
Download
Audio File (13.2 mb)
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On this episode of ID the Future from the archive, host and biologist Ray Bohlin interviews biophysicist Cornelius Hunter, author of Darwin’s God, about an article in the journal Science concerning a virus invasion of E. coli bacteria. The article subtitle announces “Natural Selection Caught in the Act,” and suggests that an impressive instance of unguided evolution has been directly witnessed. Not so fast, Hunter says. The results were intelligently designed (by the lab scientists), he notes, and the changes are less impressive than they may appear at first glance. Hunter also explains protein-protein binding and counters evolutionist Dennis Venema to argue that the way the vertebrate immune system drives change is not at all analogous to the evolutionary process of random mutations and natural selection. Moreover, Hunter says, the mammalian immune system is itself an enormous challenge for evolutionary theory.

Unfortunately, it’s common for studies such as this one to be hyped up by the scientific community and the establishment media. “Evolutionists are driven by non-scientific factors, non-scientific influences,” says Hunter. “There is a desire for the theory to be true in spite of the science, not because of the science.”

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Dr. Hunter is author of Darwin’s God: Evolution and the Problem of Evil.

Read more about protein-protein binding and the challenge it presents for evolutionary theory in Michael Behe’s book The Edge of Evolution.