ID the Future Intelligent Design, Evolution, and Science Podcast
Topic

Natural Selection

sierra-negra-volcano-galapagos-stockpack-adobe-stock.jpg
Sierra Negra Volcano - Galapagos

Paul Nelson Visits the Galapagos Islands, Pt. 2

On this episode of ID the Future, philosopher of biology Paul Nelson continues his discussion with host Andrew McDiarmid about Nelson’s recent visit to the Galapagos Islands, made famous by Charles Darwin. Nelson explains how Darwin was right — partly. Darwin urged biologists to consider the history of a plant or animal, an idea that was much neglected in the work of his predecessors. As Darwin’s experience on the Galapagos showed, and as Nelson’s experience there echoed, history must be part of our explanation for how species and populations have become the way they are today. At the same time, there are demonstrated limits to evolutionary change, Nelson argues, and so natural history alone cannot be the entire explanation for Read More ›

Nature’s Prophet Author Michael Flannery Reviews the Reviewers

On this episode of ID the Future, Michael Flannery speaks again with host Mike Keas about his book Nature’s Prophet: Alfred Russel Wallace, and His Evolution from Natural Selection to Natural Theology. Wallace was the co-discoverer of the theory of evolution by natural selection along with Charles Darwin, but in 1869 he broke with Darwin, disagreeing with him on the origin of special human attributes like art, music, and abstract thought.

Read More ›
chinese-hieroglyphs-stockpack-adobe-stock
Chinese hieroglyphs

Peter Robinson Interviews David Berlinski, Pt. 1

This episode of ID the Future features Part 1 of an interview between Uncommon Knowledge host Peter Robinson and Discovery Institute senior fellow David Berlinski, author of The Deniable Darwin and the newly released Human Nature. Berlinski begins by noting that living systems possess “a degree of complexity that is almost unfathomable” and explains how this poses an acute problem for Darwinism. The two also discuss discontinuities in the fossil record as well as Berlinski’s insistence that “any theory of natural selection must plainly meet what I have called a rule against deferred success.” Berlinski also rebuts Razib Khan’s claim that in rejecting modern evolutionary theory, conservatives sacrifice “the most powerful rejoinder” to the claim “that male and female are Read More ›

Weikart on Racism, Darwinism and Christianity

On this episode of ID the Future, Cal State history professor Richard Weikart, author of The Death of Humanity and the Case for Life, talks racism past and present, in both Christian and “scientific” secular history.

Read More ›

Richard Weikart on Michael Ruse’s “Compromise” with Christianity

On this episode of ID the Future, From Darwin to Hitler author and historian Richard Weikart returns to his conversation with Mike Keas about a recent book on Darwinism, Christianity, and war by Michael Ruse. Ruse aims at a surprising conclusion in this book.

Read More ›
background-of-old-retro-photos-from-a-family-album-stockpack-adobe-stock.jpg
background of old retro photos from a family album

Nancy Pearcey Explains the Surprising Early History of Darwinism

On this episode of ID the Future, Nancy Pearcey, author of numerous books, including Love Thy Body: Answering Hard Questions about Life and Sexuality, challenges the common belief that Darwin's leading early supporters were convinced of the main pillars of his theory. Read More ›
sneaker with broken sole.jpg
Man holding against white background one sport footwear sneaker with broken sole - quality manufacturing problems

Michael Behe on Natural Selection’s Inability to Build New Systems

On this episode of ID the Future, biochemist Michael Behe speaks further about his new book Darwin Devolves: The New Science about DNA That Challenges Evolution. Behe explains how evolutionists in the past had freedom to use their imaginations to suppose ways evolution could achieve major innovations, but new research at the molecular level now reveals obstacles previously unimagined. The most productive adaptations in nature tend overwhelmingly to be in one direction, Behe says, degrading or destroying genes, and no series of mutations have ever demonstrated the kind of coordinated effects needed to produce new systems.

Michael Behe on How Darwin Devolves Everything from Birds to Bacteria

On this episode of ID the Future, biochemist Michael Behe discusses part 3 of his new book Darwin Devolves: The New Science about DNA That Challenges Evolution. Behe explains new research showing that although evolution really can bring about adaptive changes, it does so at the nickel-and-dime level of genus and species, and apparently only by breaking or degrading genes. Behe further argues that natural selection, supposed by evolutionists to be the great driver of new developments, actually limits them.

Read More ›

Dissent from Darwin List Tops 1000 — Scientists Weigh In

Did you know that a growing number of scientists doubt the Darwinian theory of evolution? This in spite of the fact that over the past two decades the scientific establishment has ramped up their support of modern Darwinism with increasing agitation. And ramped up the persecution of scientists who dissent from Darwinian evolution. Robert Crowther explores why some scientists are willing to risk their research and careers to voice their skepticism of the theory. Listen in, and be sure to visit dissentfromdarwin.com to learn more and meet some of the scientists on the list.

Australian Zebra Finch.jpg
Australian Zebra Finch flock of five, perched on a branch. Clean blue background

Michael Behe’s Darwin Devolves: Evolution Works, But Nothing Like What They Claim For It

On this episode of ID the Future, Jay Richards interviews biologist and Center for Science and Culture senior fellow Michael Behe on his forthcoming book Darwin Devolves: The New Science About DNA That Challenges Evolution, available now for pre-order. Very recent advances in gene sequencing show that genetic mutations and natural selection sometimes work to create niche advantages, but by breaking genes, not by building new ones. It’s like increasing fuel efficiency by jettisoning things from your car: great if fuel efficiency is a matter of life or death, not so great if you actually wanted that back seat in there. And in any case, it isn’t how a car gets built in the first place. In the same way, Darwinian evolution can Read More ›