ID the Future Podcasting on Intelligent Design and Evolution
Topic

anthropic fine tuning

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Stephen Meyer: Yes, Intelligent Design is Detectable in Nature

On this episode of ID the Future, Andrew McDiarmid reads a popular essay by philosopher of science Stephen Meyer on the detectability of intelligent design in nature. The article recently appeared in Sapientia, and here at Evolution News. In the piece, Meyer explains the logic by which we routinely know there’s been a creative intelligence at work. Meyer unpacks this logic in terms of information, which we can see clearly in the cell, but elsewhere in nature, too. He also shows how this detection method is an established part of the historical sciences.

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Michael Denton Reads the First Pages of His New Book, The Wonder of Water

In this episode of ID the Future, geneticist and biochemist Michael Denton reads the beautiful introduction to his new book, The Wonder of Water. He begins at Yosemite’s Bridalveil Fall and explores how water is curiously fine-tuned for life. Indeed, thanks to a unique cluster of properties, water is able to fulfill many roles essential to our living planet. It’s thanks to some of those properties that rivers and streams can leech and carry minerals from rock to various places they’re needed in the biosphere. Water’s unusual properties also make it an ideal medium for our circulatory system. There it serves not only to transfer nutrients and oxygen but also expel carbon dioxide, excess body heat, and waste products — again, thanks to a unique cluster of properties. Denton’s new book can be purchased here.

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How a Perfect Solar Eclipse Suggests Intelligent Design

On this episode of ID: The Future, CSC Senior Fellow Jay Richards explains how perfect solar eclipses are the tip of an iceberg-size design argument found in a book he co-wrote, The Privileged Planet. The conditions for a habitable planet (right distance from the right size star, a big but not too big moon that is the right distance away to stabilize Earth’s tilt and circulate its oceans) are also conditions that make perfect solar eclipses from the Earth’s surface much more likely. And perfect eclipses aren’t just eerie and beautiful. They’ve helped scientists test and discover things, and are part of a larger pattern: The conditions needed for a habitable place in the cosmos correlate with the conditions well suited for scientific discovery. As Richards notes, this correlation is inexplicable if the cosmos is the product of chance. But if it’s intelligently designed with creatures like us in mind, it’s just what we might expect.

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