ID the Future Intelligent Design, Evolution, and Science Podcast
Topic

methodological naturalism

Distinguished Chemist Marcos Eberlin Explains How Life’s Problem-Solving Engineering Requires Foresight

On this episode of ID the Future, Jonathan Wells speaks with distinguished Brazilian chemist Marcos Eberlin about Eberlin’s new book Foresight: How the Chemistry of Life Reveals Planning and Purpose. Eberlin is a world leader in the field of mass spectrometry, and the book is endorsed by three Nobel laureates.

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Heretic FB-1

Greg Koukl Talks Heretic: One Scientist’s Journey from Darwin to Design

On this episode of ID the Future, author, speaker, and radio talk show host Greg Koukl, president of Stand to Reason, talks through a review of Heretic: One Scientist’s Journey from Darwin to Design. It’s the autobiographical story, co-written by Jonathan Witt, of distinguished Finnish bioengineer Matti Leisola. His whole perspective on science changed when he asked himself the question Koukl likes to ask: “Do you want the right answers, or do you demand the right kinds of answers — those answers that comport with naturalism, materialism, and physicalism?” Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast.

Meyer-and-Prager (2)

How Stephen Meyer Changed Dennis Prager’s Mind, Pt. 1

On this episode of ID the Future we hear part one of Dennis Prager’s remarkable Prager Show conversation with Dr. Stephen Meyer, director of the Discovery Institute’s Center for Science and Culture. Prager had been agnostic on evolution, but reading and talking with Meyer changed his mind, he says. And it wasn’t any religious concerns, Prager explains. It was the science. Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast.

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ruby throated hummingbird
Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Paul Nelson on Methodological Naturalism and the Big New Theistic Evolution Anthology

On the episode of ID the Future, philosopher of biology Paul Nelson discusses his contribution to the major new volume Theistic Evolution: A Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Critique, and in particular an essay that asks the question, should the study of evolution depend on methodological naturalism? Nelson explores how the rules of science have changed and can change again. And he argues that the rule of methodological naturalism artificially limits historical biology — its practice and its discoveries.